Digital online access will become the norm

April 12, 2010 at 2:04 pm | Posted in E-Books, Electronic Publishing, Open Access, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment

Interesting post to the liblicense list by Colin Steele.

The challenge for twenty-first century scholarship, which
includes e- books, is to implement an infrastructure for the
digital world untrammelled by the historical legacies in the
frameworks and costings of print culture. In academic monograph
and textbook production, digital online access will become the
norm, more often than not supplemented by data and multimedia
additions. Print ,however, will not die, given the likely
explosion of cheap POD outlets. Readers will still be able to
judge a book by its POD cover.

E-book futures are still clearly evolving and cost and ease of
access will be crucial issues. A discernible trend is, however,
emerging with open access e-book environments. If e-outputs and
their impacts become embedded in promotion and tenure and
research assessment exercises, then more institutions will assume
responsibility for harvesting and providing global access to
their scholarship, scholarship that combines authority with
public accessibility. A suitable vision for the twenty first
century? ‘Let those who are not old, – who are still young,
ponder this well’ (Trollope, 1866)”

Online/On-Demand Roundup

March 26, 2010 at 11:36 am | Posted in E-Books, Electronic Publishing, Monographs, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment
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Sydney UP
—————
“Sydney University Press was restarted in 2003 as a digital and print “on demand” publisher. Books can be ordered from the SUP website and are printed and dispatched as required.”

Rice UP
———-
“Users will be able to view the content online for free or purchase a copy of the book for download through the Rice University Press Web site. Alternatively, thanks to Connexions’ partnership with on-demand printer QOOP, users will be able to order printed books if they want, in every style from softbound black-and-white on inexpensive paper to leather-bound full-color hardbacks on high-gloss paper. ‘As with a traditional press, our publications will be peer-reviewed, professionally vetted and very high quality,’ Henry said. ‘But the choice to have a printed copy will be up to the customer.’…”

Manchester UP
——————–
“MUP currently has about 110 ebooks, sold through various channels, and has plans to digitise a further 300 to 400 books. Furthermore MUP currently has around 150 titles regularly reprinting as Print on Demand.”

Univ. of Pittsburgh Press
———————————
“The University of Pittsburgh Press has made 500 out-of-print titles open access with a future fee-based print-on-demand option.”

Univ. of Michigan Press
——————————
“The University of Michigan Press is announcing today that it will shift its scholarly publishing from being primarily a traditional print operation to one that is primarily digital.

Within two years, press officials expect well over 50 of the 60-plus monographs that the press publishes each year — currently in book form — to be released only in digital editions. Readers will still be able to use print-on-demand systems to produce versions that can be held in their hands, but the press will consider the digital monograph the norm. Many university presses are experimenting with digital publishing, but the Michigan announcement may be the most dramatic to date by a major university press.”

Cornell Internet-First UP
——————————–
“Just when the recording, music and publishing industries are going all-out to stop people from making their products available on the Internet, a new publishing venture at Cornell University is challenging traditional scholarly publishing by taking the opposite approach: Make the full text of a new book freely available on the Internet, and give readers the option to buy the printed book.”

amongst others … . Another developing trend is for university presses to merge with their university libraries.

Bowker reported that print-on-demand and short-run book titles grew 132% in 2008, and, for the first time, they exceeded traditional book titles.

The next logical step for the future of book publishing

March 26, 2010 at 11:34 am | Posted in Monographs, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment
Tags:

Berlin-based Springer Science+Business Media has signed an agreement with Amazon’s print-on-demand arm CreateSpace through which Springer’s English-language paperback book catalogue will be made available via POD in the U.S. Springer said that in addition to moving a significant amount of its paperback selection to POD, it will also supply many new paperback titles only in POD format. ‘If a hardcover is suitable for print-on-demand, that is the format we’ll use,” said the company’s Mark Conmy. The goal, he added, is to make all of Springer’s titles available as quickly as possible.’

Syed Hasan, Springer’s president STM Sales Americas, said the POD initiative complements the publisher’s e-book program which features editions of most print titles. “This shift to an inventory-free distribution model using print-on-demand is the next logical step for the future of book publishing.

Springer Partners with CreateSpace for Print on Demand – Publishers Weekly

ALPSP announces the publication of Scholarly Book Publishing Practice Report

March 26, 2010 at 11:08 am | Posted in E-Books, Electronic Publishing, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment
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Interesting nuggets from this report include:

1 Print-on-demand is widely used, especially
by larger publishers.

2 Amazon has emerged as a major sales channel for scholarly
books.

3 There has been a gradual move to simultaneous
publication in printed and digital form.

4 Although the e-book market has been in existence for several years it is still in a
much earlier stage than journal publishing was after a similar period.

ALPSP – Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers

OA monographs in the humanities from new European consortium

December 10, 2007 at 11:36 am | Posted in E-Books, Open Access, Print on Demand (PoD) | Comments Off on OA monographs in the humanities from new European consortium

Open Access Publishing in European Networks

OAPEN is a project in Open Access publishing for humanities monographs. The Open Access movement has developed rapidly in the sciences and in journal publishing. The consortium of University-based academic publishers who make up OAPEN believe that the time is ripe to fully explore the possibilities of Open Access in the humanities and social sciences.The OAPEN partners all currently have some involvement in the Open Access movement, and you are encouraged to view their pages on this site and on their own sites….

The partners (to date) are:

(Via Open Access News.)

OA + POD for Cornell out-of-print and rare books

April 26, 2007 at 8:19 am | Posted in Monographs, Open Access, Print on Demand (PoD) | Comments Off on OA + POD for Cornell out-of-print and rare books

Amazon.com-CU Library partnership

A selection of rare and out-of-print historical materials at Cornell University Library is only a click away for readers using a new print-on-demand service.

The library partnered with BookSurge, a subsidiary of Amazon.com, in June 2006 to make available some of its unique non-copyrighted holdings — collections ranging from historical mathematics and agriculture texts to anti-slavery pamphlets.

(Via Peter Suber.)

Open Access books increasing sales of print editions

September 6, 2006 at 8:13 am | Posted in E-Books, Electronic Publishing, Monographs, Open Access, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment

An interesting report blogged by Peter Suber:

More evidence that OA books increase sales of print editions: David Glenn, Yale U. Press Places Book Online in Hopes of Increasing Print Sales, Chronicle of Higher Education, September 8, 2006 (accessible only to subscribers). Excerpt:

[Jack M. Balkin’s] Cultural Software: A Theory of Ideology (Yale University Press, 1998)…was widely discussed in the late 1990s, but the book is now eight years old, and its sales have dwindled. So Mr. Balkin, a professor at Yale Law School, has concocted a new strategy for promulgating the spread of his own memes: He has persuaded the Yale press to release a free version of the book online. Anyone with Internet access can visit his Web site and download a high-resolution (but nonsearchable) PDF file of each chapter.

The idea, says the author, is that a small portion of the readers who sample Cultural Software online will decide to buy a printed copy of the book, producing a net increase in revenue for the press. (The online version has been issued under a license developed by Creative Commons….)

‘If this experiment succeeds,’ Mr. Balkin says, ‘it may change the way that university presses make money off their backlists. … What we are doing with Cultural Software may be a new and inexpensive way to create interest in the ‘long tail’ of scholarly works that sell only a few copies a year and would otherwise be a drag on profits.’

The director of the press, John E. Donatich, says Mr. Balkin’s experiment is one of several new explorations of electronic publishing there. Yale is among the six presses participating in the Caravan Project, a new program financed by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation that will allow publishers to release books simultaneously in print-on-demand cloth, paperback, digital, and audio formats…..

The Balkin project follows on the heels of Yochai Benkler’s The Wealth of Networks: How Social Production Transforms Markets and Freedom, which Yale published in May. Mr. Benkler, who also teaches at Yale Law School, released his book in a free online format together with wiki pages that allow readers to criticize and annotate his text. Mr. Donatich says he is confident that Mr. Benkler’s online playground has not cannibalized sales of the printed book. On the contrary, the press director reports….

Those instances are hardly the first in which readers have been encouraged to browse books online in the hope that they will buy printed copies. Most university publishers participate in the licensed browsing programs operated by Amazon and Google that allow readers to look at a finite number of pages. More ambitiously, the National Academies Press and the Brookings Institution Press have released free texts of many of their books online, often in an unusual format that lets the reader view the books page by page but does not permit the wholesale downloading or printing of chapters.

‘Our experience indicates that for many titles, free online access acts as a driver for increased sales,’ writes Michael Jon Jensen, director of Web communications for the National Academies, in an e-mail message to The Chronicle. ‘We still are seeing increased online sales and stable overall print sales.’…

‘The real question,’ Mr. Balkin says, ‘is what the vocation of academic publishing is. Academic publishers saw themselves as trying to spread knowledge’— high-quality knowledge’— as far and wide as they could … not just as a service that they provide to the universities that they’re associated with. Well, now they can promote that vocation even better than they could before. And they may even be able to make money off of it, which would be all to the good.’

(Via Open Access News.)

Rice University new digital university press

July 17, 2006 at 11:17 am | Posted in Creative Commons, E-Books, Electronic Publishing, Monographs, Open Access, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment

Rice University has announced an interesting scheme to publish books online open-access and print-on-demand:

As money-strapped university presses shut down nationwide, Rice University is turning to technology to bring its press back to life as the first fully digital university press in the United States.
Using the open-source e-publishing platform Connexions, Rice University Press is returning from a decade-long hiatus to explore models of peer-reviewed scholarship for the 21st century. The technology offers authors a way to use multimedia — audio files, live hyperlinks or moving images — to craft dynamic scholarly arguments, and to publish on-demand original works in fields of study that are increasingly constrained by print publishing….

Charles Henry, Rice University vice provost, university librarian and publisher of Rice University Press during the startup phase, said, ‘Our decision to revive Rice’s press as a digital enterprise is based on both economics and on new ways of thinking about scholarly publishing. On the one hand, university presses are losing money at unprecedented rates, and technology offers us ways to decrease production costs and provide nearly ubiquitous delivery system, the Internet. We avoid costs associated with backlogs, large inventories and unsold physical volumes, and we greatly speed the editorial process. ‘We don’t have a precise figure for our startup costs yet, but it’s safe to say our startup costs and annual operating expenses will be at least 10 times less than what we’d expect to pay if we were using a traditional publishing model,’ Henry said….

Users will be able to view the content online for free or purchase a copy of the book for download through the Rice University Press Web site. Alternatively, thanks to Connexions’ partnership with on-demand printer QOOP, users will be able to order printed books if they want, in every style from softbound black-and-white on inexpensive paper to leather-bound full-color hardbacks on high-gloss paper. ‘As with a traditional press, our publications will be peer-reviewed, professionally vetted and very high quality,’ Henry said. ‘But the choice to have a printed copy will be up to the customer.’…

Authors published by Rice University Press will retain the copyrights for their works, in accordance with Connexions’ licensing agreement with Creative Commons.”

(Via Peter Suber, Open Access News.)

Cambridge University Press changes

May 19, 2006 at 9:34 am | Posted in Electronic Publishing, Journals Publishing, Open Access, Print on Demand (PoD) | Leave a comment

An interesting article appears in Issue 224 of Information World Review. Snippets follow:

[Ian] Banbery believes it is inevitable that print will eventually disappear, particularly in STM publishing, but the picture has been muddied by the issue of VAT in Europe. “In the US, there is a much larger move to the online world,” says Banbery. It’s a move he sees as inexorable, particularly given the pressure on most university libraries over the amount of physical storage space they have available, but he does acknowledge that there is still some hesitation about getting rid of paper completely.

As CUP continues its drive to expand its journals business, it faces a number of challenges. Like all STM publishers, the CUP faces a degree of uncertainty over the issues of open access and repositories. But it is already responding to these issues and plans to launch 10 journals in the next year on the hybrid publishing model, as well as looking to find more backing for open access

Like other houses, CUP is digitising its back files and making journals available online. Technology is also making it possible to move towards a more economic way of producing information. “In the end, we will probably see journals move towards print-on-demand,” points out Banbery.

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